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Signature Profiles

Ned Block

PSGNA

Feathered Foes


Artist Bio

Sculpture is “theater in the round”, a celebration of form that reflects the human experience and prods the spirit to rise.That is true for the artist as well as the audience. Sculpture, with its tactile allure and myriad of viewpoints, insists that you explore the work and invent your own impressions. It is sculpture that begs you to look around the corner to see what's on the backside. The "continuum" takes you there.

There's a tour guide for my work. It's called the "continuum". Think of it as drawing without lifting the pencil. I attempt to create bits and pieces that lead one to the next; elements that tease your eye and demand your attention. Enticing the audience, instead of forcing it to find its own way, keeps the viewer from tiring and moving on.

My abstractions of the graceful, droll, often “quirky nature” of nature, rarely miss an opportunity to opt for form over reality. One of my birds has three wings. Nobody has called me on that, yet, but getting away with things isn’t really my way. It’s an artist’s responsibility to constantly challenge the work’s ability to explain itself. The creating can lead you astray and "you’ve gotta know when to hold’em and know when to fold’em.” I believe that good enough is not good enough.

There's a thread of humor in some of my sculpture. If you get too serious about  your work, you run the risk of losing your direction, your audience, and sometimes, your mind. I have pieces like Birds of a Feather, A Bitter Pill, A Bird in the Hand, Galileo, and Roadrunner that demonstrate my need to occasionally lighten up.

For me, the excitement comes in creating the armatures in wire and steel that are the linear implication of the forms to follow. I marvel at the manipulation of shapes by the barest twist or turn, the continuous movement of the material, and the great surprises that occur while constructing these wonderful skeletons. Puddling the steel, molding the resin, the endless filling and sanding are both drudgery and delight. The reward is the work completed…”as I see it.”